The Treasure in the Scottish Woodlands

Image Credit:Shaun Whiteman/Flickr
Image Credit:Shaun Whiteman/Flickr

According to BBC there’s a tradition in Scotland that’s almost 400 years old – hammering coins into trees. People in the old days used to do it for all sorts of reasons, as an offering, to keep the disease away or to make wishes come true. The pictures below speak for themselves.

Residents in Yorkshire, northern England, are known to be extremely careful with their money. While this stereotype may be unfair sometimes, there is evidence that on some occasions they are willing to give up precautions, renounce their lifestyle and do something nonsensical like inserting coins into trees.

Image Credit:drew_073/Flickr
Image Credit:drew_073/Flickr
Image Credit:Ken Wewerka/Flickr
Image Credit:Ken Wewerka/Flickr
Image Credit:58° North Photography/Flickr
Image Credit:58° North Photography/Flickr

People in Ingleton, North Yorkshire have some of the most stunning forests in the country and sometimes paths lead you to a totally different view than the breathtaking sights and picturesque waterfalls. At first glance it seems that the coins almost merged with the wood, but this is just the effect the weather had on metal.

Image Credit:Paul Morriss/Flickr
Image Credit:Paul Morriss/Flickr
Image credit:Donshappysnaps/Flickr
Image credit:Donshappysnaps/Flickr

Some people suggest that the reason the money is crammed into the trunk of the tree is not only the desire to increase one’s welfare. It is believed that the number of coins pushed in the timber might get you a similar number of children. What fertility might have in common with this practice is hard to say. The tree itself, though long dead, has come to resemble a reptile, the coins appearing almost scale like. The coins get smaller and smaller as time passes by and the elements of nature are unforgiving.

Image Credit:heartbeeps/Flickr
Image Credit:heartbeeps/Flickr

Dovedale in Derbyshire is also home to such a tree. Owned by the National Trust in the UK, it attracts over 1 million visitors annually for its spectacular landscapes. If you happen to go there to hunt a money tree, do not forget that you can see the famous caves also known as Dove Holes.

– via BBC.co.uk

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